Jun.30, 2012

Press Release

3D printer manufacturer Stratasys announced a joint initiative with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to jointly develop fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing to foster energy efficient production.

The project aims to develop FDM additive manufacturing technology to make it a mainstream manufacturing process. The project targets two main objectives:

  1. development of in-process inspection to assure part quality and suitability for service.
  2. development of carbon fiber reinforced FDM feedstock materials to produce strong, lightweight components.

Weight reduction has a major impact on fuel consumption. For example, on a commercial aircraft, a 500-pound weight reduction results in a quarter-million-dollar savings in fuel costs each year.

Manufacturing is a major component of the U.S. economy, accounting for 11 percent of GDP ($1.5 trillion), more than 12 million jobs, and 57 percent of U.S. exports. The initiative presents a significant opportunity, particularly in the aerospace and automotive industries.

The overarching goal of the DOE initiative is to reduce the energy usage of U.S. industry, commercialize new products more quickly, and revitalize the global competitiveness of U.S. manufacturing.

"The research and development done at the MDF allows us to explore innovative ideas in next-generation materials and manufacturing technologies to help U.S. industry," says Dr. Lonnie Love, Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader for Automation, Robotics and Manufacturing at ORNL. "The project with Stratasys will lead to commercialization of new products that will ultimately make U.S. manufacturing more competitive and energy efficient."

Beyond reducing energy use via lighter-weight transportation vehicles, the additive manufacturing or 3D printing process itself is more efficient than traditional subtractive manufacturing processes, such as machining parts or machining production tools and molds.

"The additive process can reduce the energy impact of manufacturing," says Stratasys Vice President of Direct Digital Manufacturing Jeff DeGrange. "It reduces material consumption, waste streams, large investments into metal tooling, warehouse costs and transportation costs. You don't have to bring in material just to machine 75 percent of it away as with traditional manufacturing. Additive manufacturing deposits material only where it's needed to grow a part."

Source: Stratasys

 

Posted in 3D Printer Companies

 

 

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