Nov.12, 2012

Dutch sculpturist Eric van Straaten makes 'realistic' 3D sculptures. His creative process involves a 3D printer that produces the objects of his complex computer creations.

There is no technique that is capable of achieving such a great degree of hyper(sur)realism as 3D-modeling. At the same time, 3D printing is the only technique with which virtual models can be made actually physically touchable. Physical expressiveness in form and content is the biggest strength of the work of Eric van Straaten: while the sculptures remain to have a certain digital feel to them, the pieces contain a weirdly corporeality. Balancing on the edge of kitsch, the marzipan-like quality of the material resonates beautifully with the apparent innocence of the scenery.

Stefan Schoorl (Virtueel Platform) visited his studio in Haarlem, the Netherlands.

Eric van Straaten: "I was a photographer and musician and one day I decided to quit. I wanted to be a sculptor. I had only one problem: I was not good enough in sculpting. The craft was not for me. But 3D printing opened a whole new world for me. "

Eric creates his sculptures in graphics software and get them printed at a 3D printing service company. "I call myself a sample artist, a mash-up artist. Often I use existing designs and masks and keep adjusting until I think it is 'real' enough. Eventually my images are kind of collages."

"Working with digital technology brings opportunities, but it has also limitations. The software in large part determines the shape of my design and 3D printer determines what material can be used. I depend on the technique. Sometimes it can be very frustrating when something does not work, but it triggers also something else. I find it exciting to seek possibilities within limitations. You become very creative from it. From the infinite possibilities. "

 

(Images credit: Eric van Straaten)

 

Source: Virtueel Platform

 

Posted in 3D Designers

 

 

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