Jan.16, 2013

Modular Robotics, the makers of Cubelets, were at the CES 2013 showing off their modular robotic construction kit for kids. The basic Cubelets kit (KT06) contains 6 Cubelets that can be snapped together to make a variety of robots with no programming and no wires. This is a perfect toy for teaching kids to learn robots and science. You can build robots that drive around on a tabletop, respond to light and other objects, and have surprisingly lifelike behavior. But instead of programming that behavior, you snap the cubelets together and watch the behavior emerge like with a flock of birds or a swarm of bees. The basic kit KT06 costs $160 and individule module costs around 20~30 dollars.


In the video below, Emily Plage made a demo of the cubes and the robots. Their newest cube is a Bluetooth module developed two months ago that you can use it to pair your Cubelets robot with your phone — read sensor values from far away or remote control your mobile robot. Or you can connect your Cubelets robot to your PC and reprogram any connected Cubelets using the Cubelets CODE web application and a simple API. The team also brought to CES a prototype of an adapter made on a 3D printer. It can be snaped on the robot and allows you to connect blocks, such as Lego bricks to your robot to make a robot in different shapes.

 

 

 

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Andy Perkins wrote at 1/16/2013 7:40:25 PM:

I applaud these products for being fun, easy to explore, and introducing sensors, but I don't think any true 'learning' is done. When things just click together and there is 'no programming', then there is no failure and the learning that comes from it. I would love to 'play' with these, but I don't think I'll 'learn' from them.



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