Jun.13, 2013

Two bills in New York City aim to regulate 3D firearms.

The New York Daily News reports that New York City Council member Lewis Fidler plans to introduce a bill that would regulate 3D printed guns.

The bill specifies that it's illegal to make 3D printed weapons without a gunsmith license, that the guns must be registered with police within 72 hours and each weapon must have a serial number.

Fidler stressed the importance of regulation - "If left unregulated, these would be weapons without histories — potentially no identifying marks or sales histories. We wouldn't even know these weapons exist, until they were fired," Fidler said.

Lew Fidler isn't the only New York lawmaker to introduce legislation for 3D printable guns. State Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal (D-Manhattan) has introduced a bill to prohibit the manufacturing, sale and use of firearms and ammunition magazines made with digital 3D printers.

"It can become dangerous if people start printing their own firearms and there is no regulation," said Rosenthal.

It is not yet clear how other Council members might stand on the proposal. However according to the NYPD, anyone making a firearm already need a license to do so, and gun owners must register their weapons. But in reality, how can you enforce it? It is pretty difficult to track all the 3D printed gun made at home. Will the people who printed gun at home register it with the city? Lawmakers still need to find effective ways to move ahead with what they proposed.

 

 

Posted in 3D Printing Applications

 

 

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colt45 wrote at 6/18/2013 6:01:57 PM:

Because current regulations on existing weapons with serial numbers manufactured by real companies are that much more enforceable and effective? Seriously people, for 250$ anyone can buy a fully engineered functioning drop pistol that is equally untraceable, and much more effective. This legislation proves just how clueless legislators really are.

BB wrote at 6/17/2013 3:29:45 AM:

MEK dissolves ABS much better than acetone, though MEK may be difficult to find in NY. You can just put ABS objects in a kitchen oven and cook them into amorphous blobs too, though I suspect that, once fired, the plastic will retain detectable traces of burned cartridge propellant. The only thing these laws do is make criminals out of good people. Our masters and rulers are crazy to think that any good comes of them--especially when balanced against the intended benefits of the Bill of Rights and Second Amendment protections from government infringement on the right to bear arms. Rights don't require permission slips from .gov and the founders of this nation and framers of the Constitution promised us it would remain that way in THIS republic! Do you need permission to exercise any other rights (enumerated in the Bill of Rights or otherwise)? No--I thought not (and screaming fire in a movie theater is violence; it is not an exercise of free speech--for any morons reading this comment). Gun owners are the new Jews!

Michael wrote at 6/15/2013 1:39:34 PM:

And once fired, drooped in acetone and you have no gun evidence left! Print another with the same serial number. Who's to know.

Proteus wrote at 6/14/2013 9:12:34 PM:

"If left unregulated, these would be weapons without histories — potentially no identifying marks or sales histories. We wouldn't even know these weapons exist, until they were fired," Fidler said. He does realize that even if they are regulated criminals can still make them, right? IDIOT!



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