Jun.26, 2013

A company in Denmark, Create It Real announced it has created software that could prevent a 3D printer from printing gun parts.

The company says its software works like antivirus software, which "scans the model and tries to match its characteristics with the characteristics of a firearm. If certain features align, the software will not allow the user to view and print the model."

Create It Real sells 3D printers, software and electronic platform. According to Jeremie Pierre Gay, CEO of the company, this add-on can quickly recognizes digital gun part models, and then a deeper inspection will be made for avoiding false "alarm". And they have so far added the data for the 3D printable gun Liberator and DefDist's AR-15 lower receiver. More parts will be added to the database in the future.

The company is working on bring this software to the market. Still, there are some issues. Technically it would be difficult to recognize all the gun parts. A software can prevent printing of a hollow cylinder of a certain size, a firing pin, or a certain type of spring, but no way it can detect those small parts commonly used in every device.

Secondly the government may regulate 3D printed guns by insisting 3D printer manufacturers install such kind of software. It would be pretty difficult for a small company trying to regulate 3D printed guns by selling software or solutions to 3D printer manufacturers, while a lot of them use only open source software. And, will consumers purchase a 3D printer with anti-gun-parts software installed, which says "Firearm detect! You cannot print this model" once for a while? It is getting too complex.

Create It Real says in its press release:

3D printing has recently hit the news as a young American was able to create a working firearm by using a 3D printer to build the lower receiver, the only part of a gun which cannot easily be purchased. Only a few months later, 3D models of an entirely printable gun appeared on the Internet. As proven by the Australian police, those homemade firearms are highly dangerous and, in many countries, illegal. Now new software developed by a 3D printer company will prevent 3D printing of guns.

There have been debates in the media on how to stop people from printing guns on their 3D printers. Banning the technology would mean a huge regression towards what The Economist called the "third industrial revolution". Banning the files which contain the 3D information of a gun does not seem to be possible in the times of digital file sharing.

The Danish company Create it REAL, however, has found a solution to this issue. Upon opening a 3D file, the smart software scans the model and tries to match its characteristics with the characteristics of a firearm. If certain features align, the software will not allow the user to view and print the model.

For safety reasons, there are no models of firearms stored on the user's computer but rather a list of its characteristics.

Create it REAL's CEO Jérémie Pierre Gay assured that "printing other, non-firearm models is of course still possible."

 

Posted in 3D Software

 

 

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jeff wrote at 6/28/2013 2:09:28 AM:

Danmark is always up whit some new cool inovation. 3d gun is bad. but i guees they can stop all official 3d print factorys who produce for goverment accepted consumer store. but dont forget there are still people who know how to make 3d printer i belive big companys like lego is behign this. becouse lego wil suffer if 3d print get a break trough. there are enourmos power holding back this from you local electro there are 100 of issues that must be soled, that mean when you get a printer you wont be able to print out a ugly rat becouse it mickey mouse fault

Jeff wrote at 6/27/2013 1:33:54 PM:

The effective life of this software, once offered to the public, will be likely be measured in days before someone writes a virus / hack that can disable it. There are hacks to unlock cell phones within weeks of them hitting the market, and this hits far more "hot buttons" with more people than wanting to have an unlocked cell does.

Julio wrote at 6/26/2013 11:14:08 PM:

It is kinda dumb. We the guys who don't want to print a gun don't need it, cause anyway we are not going to do it, and the guys who do want to print a gun won't get it neither. The only use I see for this siftware is for public machines, but not for the home user.

Kirk wrote at 6/26/2013 8:04:52 PM:

One of the more ridiculous attempts to limit additive manufacturing, given that any model could potentially be rendered a firearm by scaling dimensions, interrupting the print run, filling voids with other materials that can later be removed, etc. This is a media-focused knee-jerk issue, as a functional all-plastic firearm can be produced using a soda straw, epoxy and a rubber band - no need for a 3D printer at all. The most-produced firearm worldwide is often claimed for the AK-47, which itself is fabricated for the main part using stamped sheet metal. The issue in the world is not 3D printed firearms, it is that 3D printing threatens traditional mass manufacturing economies who are trying to put up every possible barrier to the new mechanisms for production that could return fabrication to where consumption occurs, making their part of the world no longer of material necessity...and of course, the company offering this "protection" will get paid if their product is made mandatory for new 3d printers, even if it cannot work.

jd90 wrote at 6/26/2013 7:52:57 PM:

I wouldn't believe them unless someone can independently test it with a designs this company hasn't seen before. Besides, there's over a dozen parts in the "liberator". Most of those parts don't look like gun parts.

defcad wrote at 6/26/2013 7:09:27 PM:

LOL This is SOOOOOOOOO GONNA GET PWNED.....just on pricinple. Censorship is BS and will not work.

Proteus wrote at 6/26/2013 7:01:01 PM:

We in the defcad irc chatroom are laughing at this. There is no way you could possibly do this without banning the printing of everything.



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