Nov.18, 2013

Senator Charles Schumer is raising concerns about the spread of technology to create 3D firearms.

As the technology to print 3D printed guns advances, a federal law that banned the undetectable guns is about to expire. U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer says he's seeking an extension of the law before it expires Dec. 9.


image: ATF

He said the technology of so-called 3D printing has advanced to the point anyone with $1,000 and an Internet connection can access the plastic parts that can be fitted into a gun. Those firearms can't be detected by metal detectors or X-ray machines.

Schumer says that means anyone can download a gun cheaply, then take the weapons anywhere, including high-security areas.

The Democrat is pushing the extension along with Sens. Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Bill Nelson of Florida. The effort was announced Sunday.

The technology has recently advanced to create handguns capable of shooting several shots, rather than just one, before it ceases to function. Schumer also says the guns can now be made with all plastic parts, and no metal.

A blueprint for one such firearm was recently downloaded more than 100,000 times, Schumer says.

Last week the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) joined its counterparts in Austria, Germany, and elsewhere in purchasing 3D printers and testing 3D printed guns. The ATF used the blueprints from internet to print the plastic gun on a 3-D printer.

The ATF published a series of videos of the tests on YouTube showing what looked like a Liberator model of a 3D gun exploding upon being fired. The ATF's testing showed that the weapon, while not quite as powerful as most guns, could penetrate several inches of soft flesh as well as a human skull.

'The bottom line is, the penetration results demonstrated that the Liberator is a lethal weapon,' Earl Griffith, chief of ATF's firearms technology branch told the Huffington Post.

Another model, created with the popular ABS polymer and an advanced printer, could fire as many as 8 shots without any problems.



"We are looking at a world in which anyone with a little bit of cash can bring an undetectable gun that can fire multiple bullets anywhere — including planes, government buildings, sporting events and schools," Schumer said. "3-D printers are a miraculous technology that have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing, but we need to make sure they are not being used to make deadly, undetectable weapons."

 

Posted in 3D Printing Applications

 

 

Maybe you also like:


 


H Kline wrote at 11/20/2013 1:41:42 AM:

Chuckie Shoomer never misses a chance to exaggerate things, tell lies, and run to the nearest camera to stoke his ego. Standing between Chuckie and a camera is like standing in front of a charging rhino.

Max Rafferty wrote at 11/19/2013 7:35:42 PM:

"Another model, created with the popular ABS polymer and an advanced printer" What printer would that be? The weapon pictured doesn't appear to have any of the typical layer striations produced by desktop 3D printers. ABS or not, those regular weak points are going to be a primary concern for a viable multi-shot firearm, and no one is going to be able to produce one without them with "$1000 and an internet connection".

Dan wrote at 11/19/2013 9:19:56 AM:

"3-D printers are a miraculous technology that have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing, but we need to make sure they are not being used to make deadly, undetectable weapons."// Yes, yes, in the same way, as you do everything possible to be convinced that any rubber glove, the linen clothespeg, a plastic tube of suitable diameter and any piece of plastic which can serve brisk, won't be used for the same purposes. That is - in any way you aren't convinced of it. And it not so strongly also disturbed you :) You want to prolong the law on prohibition of undetectable of the weapon? - ok, certainly USE of such things has to be defined in the law as a crime. But here such increased concern of rather three-dimensional printers meanwhile looks, to put it mildly, as "obscurantism of lazy and not so clever legislators and representatives of law enforcement agencies".



Leave a comment:

Your Name:

 


Subscribe us to

3ders.org Feeds 3ders.org twitter 3ders.org facebook   

About 3Ders.org

3Ders.org provides the latest news about 3D printing technology and 3D printers. We are now six years old and have around 1.5 million unique visitors per month.

News Archive