June 20, 2014

Shapeways announced its collaboration with Google on its new Made with Code initiative to inspire millions of girls to code and create.

Made with Code offers fun and simple projects aimed at helping girls take the first step in learning how to code. The premier project of the initiative is a coding project based on Blockly, Google's visual programming editor, in which girls can create a custom bracelet that Shapeways will 3D print in its New York City factory using EOS printers.

How to creating a Made with Code 3D printed bracelet?

1. You code it: To create a bracelet, girls ages 13-18 should visit madewithcode and select "Code a Bracelet" from the Projects tab. From there, they can use the Blockly programming language to set the width, diameter, color, and message of your bracelet.

2. You order it: Once the design is complete, choose 'Print Free w/ Shapeways'. Verify your U.S. mailing address. Confirm your order.

3. The bracelet's digital file will be automatically uploaded to Shapeways.com for 3D printing. A limited amount of bracelets will be available for free from Google, and then anyone can order more bracelets by downloading the digital file from Made with Code and uploading it to Shapeways.

The Made with Code bracelets are 3D printed in Shapeways' high-quality nylon plastic on 3D printers from the German printer manufacturer, EOS, which is providing extra P760 SLS 3D printers to support the initiative.

"Coding gives you the power to create and invent things that could help millions of people with your ideas; sadly we've seen that bias and stereotypes are keeping most teenage girls from expressing interest in learning to code. We're launching Made with Code to inspire millions of girls to experience the power of coding and to see it as a way to have fun and achieve their dreams." - Megan Smith, Vice President, Google[x].

The bracelet project is built on top of the Shapeways API, which enables developers to make apps that make products. The Made with Code and Shapeways bracelet project is a way for girls to gain a deeper understanding of the ways technology is connected to everything around them.

Check out the video below iJustine gives a quick tour of the coding project, and Lauren from Shapeways shows you how it is 3D printed.



Posted in 3D Printing Services

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Kaitlyn Hutchinson wrote at 1/11/2016 5:47:52 PM:

Is it free to actually make it or does it cost money and if it does how much?

Flash wrote at 6/23/2014 6:54:12 PM:

You have to start somewhere and even using the interface as a real beginner might help encourage smoe people. You are right it isn't exactly coding yet but again it's just a start to show someone they can make something. On thing I wuold really like is if they allowed you to download the file yourself so you can 3D print it yourself and see that process. I am looking forward to seeing more from this project. I'm hoping it turns into something more like CoderDojo though with more true coding.

Steven Veltema wrote at 6/23/2014 4:26:00 AM:

looks a lot like Scratch, but without having to actually think. As a possible entry into printing it is mildly intriguing but... - no modelling (even in a limited form) - no programming (not even an if/then or a single loop) - no data export to print your own. I can't see how this will lead to further interest in either 3d printing or programming, but if it helps even one person to get their foot in the door mission accomplished I guess.

Don Stratton wrote at 6/20/2014 9:48:59 PM:

That's just sad. Those girls are not learning a damn thing about programming, they are just setting a few parameters on an application designed to make bracelets.

Biged Fromny wrote at 6/20/2014 6:38:23 PM:

this is not coding, it's marketing to a female teen demographic. coding is making if statements, scripts, and compiling. this is inputting your custom parameters to spit out a customized model. still pretty cool though

Biged Fromny wrote at 6/20/2014 3:09:31 PM:

sorry, this isn't coding. this is marketing to a young demographic. coding is sitting there at your computer, banging out strings and 'if' statements, then compiling. this is putting in your custom parameters and pushing the 'print' button.



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