Nov.12, 2014

GE announced Wednesday that it will build a new advanced manufacturing facility outside of Pittsburgh to develop and implement 3D printing technologies.

The new facility represents a $32M investment over three years by the company and will result in the creation of 50 high-tech engineering jobs initially, according to the company.

The facility will focus on improving capabilities and usage of additive manufacturing across GE, advancing materials sciences and inspection technologies. It aims to strengthen GE's presence in advanced manufacturing through development of training program for GE technologists in additive manufacturing.

Dan Heintzelman, GE vice chairman said, "Advanced manufacturing is driving a profound change in industry and at GE. It is how we will compete and win in the future. We can more efficiently invent and build products for our customers, while driving better margins for our investors. This new facility is crucial for bringing advanced manufacturing technology to all our businesses."

Pennsylvania is already home to more than 8,500 GE employees with significant presence from GE's Transportation, Power & Water, Oil & Gas and Energy Management business. The site will be located outside of Pittsburgh in Findlay Township, PA and construction is expected to begin in March 2015 to be completed by September 2015.

Changing GE manufacturing is seeing financial results. In Rutland, Vermont a $75 million investment to expand the site to allow GE Aviation to use advanced materials has led to more than $300 million in engine production savings. Next year in Auburn, AL, mass production begins on the complex interiors of fuel nozzles for the next-generation LEAP jet engine being developed by CFM International, a 50/50 joint company of GE and France's Snecma (Safran). Each engine has 20 nozzles (produced by Advanced Atomization Technologies, a GE and Parker Aerospace joint venture) with GE's special 3D-printed interiors to make the engine more durable, lighter, and fuel efficient. 3D printing allows GE to make the nozzle interiors as one part rather than 20 individual parts, reducing the number of brazes and welds required using traditional methods.

GE expects that more 3D printed components can be expected in the next few years. As it said last year, GE wanted 3D printing to "touch" more than half of its manufacturing in 20 years.


 


Posted in 3D Printing Applications

 

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