May 29, 2015 | By Simon

Back in 2013, it was nearly unheard of to have a desktop 3D printer that costs less than $100 at retail, however this is exactly what 3D printing startup Peachy Printer was able to accomplish after knocking their Kickstarter campaign out of the water with over $651,091 CAD raised from over 4,000 backers.  

The printer - which operates through the use of photolithographic technology - uses a controlled beam of light to cure light sensitive resin into hard objects; while a laser moves on the X and Y axes to create the layer shapes, an integrated drip system that houses resin is dripped to determine the height of the Z axis.  

“Its performance was rudimentary at best, and it sure wasn't pretty, but the unique nature of the product and the groundbreaking price tag set it apart from other printers and inspired people from all over the world to support the project,” admit the Peachy Printer team.    

“Ever since (getting funded on Kickstarter) it's been a whirlwind of hard work, innovative thinking, problem solving, teamwork and community involvement all in the pursuit of one goal - getting the Peachy Printer into the hands of our backers.”

This week, the company has announced that the final iteration of their innovative Peachy Printer is now available for pre-order and will begin shipping to their earliest backers in July - much to the delight of many who have been wondering where their units were long after backing the campaign! 

“Today we show you the result of all the hard work since the beginning of the project - The Peachy Printer Kit V1.0,” said the company on their recently updated Kickstarter page.   

“If you backed us for a kit, (you’ll be able to) build (the printer soon) once it arrives at your doorstep.”

This protonik decor vase was printed with no support material. The bumpy texture is a result of the many small holes in the model which did not fully come through in the print.

Of course -  just like most other hardware startups - some changes were made to the design in order to create both a more reliable product and a product that didn’t exceed development costs.

Among other changes to the printer include the exclusion of using audio signal to print and the decision to move to a completely digital circuit.

“What does this mean for you?” asked the company.   

“Easier and quicker setup and calibration, less troubleshooting, less cables and a lot more features and flexibility … we are thrilled to be able to bring such an upgrade to the $100 kit, as the digital circuit approach was originally intended only for The Peachy Pro.”

The digital circuit (left) pictured beside the audio circuit (right).

These balloons were printed with no support material. The balloon that's bending to the left originally printed straight up and slowly bend over afterwards.

Many of the backers will likely appreciate the notion to upgrade the circuits - especially after waiting this long for the orders to be delivered.  

To find out more about the company's Kickstarter fulfilment plan if you were an early backer, head over to the company’s Kickstarter page.  Those who didnt’ get in on the earlybird Kickstarter orders can still order one of the company’s new printers by heading over to their company website.   


 

Posted in 3D Printers

 

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PaRaDoX wrote at 1/30/2016 5:39:58 PM:

mich To convert the STL file you must to use software that converts STL in to the G-Code later you can upload a G-code file to a program which they set up to send DTMF signals to the engine or whatever hardware you have. When it comes to the program that they put version 0.2.267 works great for me on the Dell Inspiron 5110 but in newer versions are more complicated to use I know that these programs are still in development but it's great you guys going just resume the greetings from Serbia.Otherwise programs I tested the device on its own which I set up and listen good command codes that my computer sends.Bye

PaRaDoX wrote at 1/30/2016 5:33:26 PM:

mich To convert the STL file you must to use software that converts STL in to the G-Code later you can upload a G-code file to a program which they set up to send DTMF signals to the engine or whatever hardware you have. When it comes to the program that they put version 0.2.267 works great for me on the Dell Inspiron 5110 but in newer versions are more complicated to use I know that these programs are still in development but it's great you guys going just resume the greetings from Serbia.Otherwise programs I tested the device on its own which I set up and listen good command codes that my computer sends.Bye

Rod wrote at 10/27/2015 10:21:54 PM:

can anyone tell me can I get 1 in Ireland?

mitch n2ri@yahoo.com wrote at 6/7/2015 7:41:18 PM:

what is used for the build surface that model attaches to when printing and being raised layer by layer?

mitch n2ri@yahoo.com wrote at 6/7/2015 7:10:30 PM:

also at top it states $100 3D printer & scanner. what scanner? and what are specs as I see 3 dif sizes plus lots of extra parts holding things like circuit boards etc in the open

mitch n2ri@yahoo.com wrote at 6/7/2015 7:06:00 PM:

so how do I convert STL files to SLA like resin printers use? Iboxe Nano wont say other than Slic3r does it. Slic3r needs printer shape settings programed in to do that function. also why are there no Amber UV blocking covers for your printer as these type require so as not to set resin too soon?



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