May 18, 2017 | By Tess

Metal 3D printing company 3D Metalforge has opened Singapore’s first end-to-end Metal Additive Manufacturing Center (AMC). The facility, which offers a range of metal 3D printing solutions and services, was inaugurated on May 17 in cooperation with Singapore’s Minister for Trade and Industry Mr. S. Iswaran.

The 3D printing facility will reportedly be used to serve a range of different sectors, including the oil and gas, marine, precision engineering, and construction industries. The center is equipped with design, engineering, 3D printing, post-processing, and finishing technologies, and will be operated by a dedicated team made up of mostly local designers and engineers.

According to 3D Metalforge, it has invested roughly S$2.5 million ($1.8 million) in the AMC, and is planning on putting another S$2 to S$3 million ($1.4 to $2.15 million) into the facility over the next couple years. The opening of the center, right next to 3D Metalforge’s facility in Science Park, marks a big step for the young company’s growth.

“Singapore’s strategic location, pro-business environment, high-technology infrastructure, and its intense focus on the additive manufacturing sector to support our economic transformation to Industry 4.0 makes it a logical choice for us to set up our AMC here,” explained Matthew Waterhouse, Chief Executive Officer of 3D Metalforge.

“Today’s launch underscores 3D Metalforge’s commitment as a homegrown company to deliver end-to-end 3D metal printing solutions to our customers,” he added.

3D Metalforge was born last year out of a collaboration between Singapore-based 3D design and printing service 3D Matters and SIMTech, otherwise known as the Agency for Science, Technology and Research’s Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology.

Trade and Industry minister S. Iswaran (center) with 3D Metalforge CEO Matthew Waterhouse (far left) and stakeholders at AMC launch

(Photos: 3D Metalforge)

The company, which specializes in metal 3D printing services, is planning to eventually expand into nearby markets, such as Indonesia, Dubai, and Qatar.

In addition to the additive manufacturing center’s launch, 3D Metalforge has also signed a new partnership agreement with SIMTech to develop and commercialize LAAM, Singapore’s first laser-based metal 3D printing technology for large format parts.

The technology, which uses a high-energy laser beam and a specialized powder blowing process, reportedly has one of the biggest build platforms for metal 3D printing and has rapid deposition rates of up to 1 kg/hour. The joint effort to bring the innovative 3D printing technology to market will be supported with funding from the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC).

“The LAAM technology will be a gamechanger for the industry.” said Waterhouse. “This means that we will be able to produce high quality, large format, cost effective metal parts with first class mechanical properties that not only meets, but exceeds the quality standards for traditionally manufactured parts at our AMC. This will allow key industries such as aerospace, precision engineering, oil and gas, marine and offshore, and automotive to capitalize on the benefits of additive manufacturing.”

In recent years, Singapore has been ramping up its support of 3D printing technologies, seeing the manufacturing process as a way to push the country’s economy and industries ahead. Indeed, the entire NAMIC initiative is geared towards encouraging local companies to adopt and integrate additive manufacturing. The country has also drawn interest from abroad, as American company Emerson recently launched a state-of-the-art 3D printing facility in Clementi, Singapore.

 

 

Posted in 3D Printer Company

 

 

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