May 29, 2014

Earlier this month, a Japanese man who lives in Kawasaki City, Kanagawa Prefecture was arrested on suspicion of illegally possessing handguns created by a 3D printer.


In order to help controlling the development and creation of 3D printed illegal items, Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP), one of the largest printing companies in Japan, has proposed a security program that would control STL data to check if there is any risk of copyright infringement and the creation of illegal items.

In recent years, technology such as 3D scanning and 3D printing has been widely adopted. Consumers can easily purchase a 3D printer at any electronics stores. On the other hand, internet opens possibilities to download any 3D data of objects online, including firearms, licensed icons or symbols.

DNP has proposed to develop a wide and comprehensive database of patterns, algorithms, and raw 3D data. If the data pattern in any STL file matches the items listed in the black list of the products, the system will recognize it as illegal data and would not allow it to be used by the 3D printer.

The program will compare and analyze STL data obtained from 3D scanners and 3D model software and even pre-set STL data made from specific 3D objects. Even if you modify the 3D data, for example changing an angle, the system will still be able to match it to the listed products. But DNP says the program has no impact on the performance of the 3D printer.

The initiative goal is to prevent illegal possession of firearms and the creation of illegal and dangerous items such as certain bladed objects, figures and copyrighted logo, symbols or designs.

DNP says it will work with organizations that provide companies and organizations information security services to develop the program. It plans to implement this program in 2017.

 

via VR-Zone

Posted in 3D Software

 

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Jasen wrote at 5/30/2014 7:43:31 AM:

So DNP hates free expression! We need more freedom in the world not less.

Jeff wrote at 5/29/2014 6:31:31 PM:

I can see some big, mainstream companies wanting to preload software like this on printers they sell. It will last for a short time, until a big company or two offer thiers without the block (for a better profit margin - the software costs money). Remember when AOL dominated the consumer internet market? Proprietary browser that limited search results? How did that work out?

Nilok wrote at 5/29/2014 5:33:32 PM:

So does the printer not work if it isn't connected to the internet or are you able to circumvent this solution by just letting it connect? Also, what happens if starts positively IDing things that should be able to be printed?

WildBill wrote at 5/29/2014 4:44:44 PM:

Funny there isn't this fuss over cnc lathes and milling machines, they also make much superior weapons.

John Pickens wrote at 5/29/2014 4:01:49 PM:

OK, what about regular milling machines and lathes? This is such a stupid idea, it will never work.

Julio wrote at 5/29/2014 3:38:57 PM:

Those programs will neve make it to the market. They would make a complete mess and people would hate them. Of course, no one will ever adopt them, they would have to be installed by the manufacturer, but then, who will want to sell handicaped printers?

WTF wrote at 5/29/2014 3:38:09 PM:

What a shameless grab for attention by DNP. This will never work and they know it.

Jim wrote at 5/29/2014 3:25:43 PM:

This type of security technology will always be one step behind. How does it know a specific part could be for a gun? You could just modify the design until it can't tell; just break it down to simpler shapes perhaps.

Nilok wrote at 5/29/2014 11:23:29 AM:

So does the printer not work if it isn't connected to the internet or are you able to circumvent this solution by just letting it connect? Also, what happens if starts positively IDing things that should be able to be printed?



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