Mar.4, 2013

Researchers at Germany's Hasso Plattner Institute have come up a new rapid prototyping system that produces 3D objects using a laser cutter. It is called LaserOrigami.

LaserOrigami is a remarkable new fabrication technique that is faster than traditional 3D fabrication techniques such as 3D printing. Not like the traditional laser cutting the resulting 3D objects from LaserOrigami require no manual assembly.

The key idea behind LaserOrigami is that it achieves three-dimensionality by folding and stretching the workpiece, instead of placing joints. LaserOrigami heats up some selected sections of plastic with a de-focused laser, which distributes the laser's power across a larger surface. These sections will become compliant and bend down under the force of gravity. The cutting and bending are done in a single integrated process by automatically moving the cutting table up and down. A servo motor can also be used to control the angles of rotation. And finally when users take out the workpiece, it is already fully assembled and ready to use.

The image below shows three different ways of making. On the left is a 3D printed camera holder. It took four hours to make on a Dimension Elite 3D printer; In the middle is made with traditional laser cutting which requires assembly; On the right is fabricated by LaserOrigami, which is finished in three minutes and no assembly needed.

Below are more examples made by LaserOrigami, including a business card holder, a pen holder, and a nice plant holder.

(Photos credit: Hasso Plattner Institute)

The team members include Stefanie Mueller, Bastian Kruck, and supervisor Patrick Baudisch, members of the human computer interface lab at the Hasso Plattner Institute. Their new finding will be presented at CHI2013 (The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) in April.

 

 

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Posted in Rapid Prototyping

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Sathya wrote at 7/3/2013 3:23:25 PM:

But what s the Material ? It s Comaprable with engineering Plastics.



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