Oct 20, 2016 | By Tess

As we well know, behind every great 3D print is a great maker. But, what would a 3D print actually be without the modeling tools at the maker’s hands? Not much. Of course, trying to choose the best 3D modeling software for you can sometimes be a bit daunting, so we’ve put together a comprehensive (but not exhaustive) list of our top choices for 3D modeling and 3D printing software. Check them out:

3D modeling software - Beginners

1. TinkerCAD

2. 3DSlash

3. 3DTin

4. 123D Design

5. Sculptris

6. MeshMixer

3D modeling software - Intermediate to Advanced

7.SketchUp

8. FreeCAD

9. Blender

10. OpenSCAD

11. Onshape

12. Inventor

13. Rhinoceros

14. Grasshopper

15. SolidWorks

16. Cinema 4D

17. MAYA

18. ZBrush

19. 3ds Max

20. Fusion360

21. LightWave 3D

22. AutoCAD

23. MoI3d

24. MODO

25. Wings3D

26. Creo

27.BRL-CAD

Slicers & 3D Printer Hosts

28. Cura

29. CraftWare

30. Netfabb Basic

31. Repetier

32. Simplify3D

33. Slic3r

34. OctoPrint

35. 3DPrinterOS

3D MODELING SOFTWARE - BEGINNERS

3D printing software #1: TinkerCAD

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

System: Browser-based online app

Type: Geometric 3D modeling

Made by: Autodesk

Autodesk’s TinkerCAD is probably recognized as one of the most accessible and beginner-friendly 3D modeling programs out there. The free 3D printing software, which is browser-based, allows entry-level makers to navigate the first steps of 3D design by quite literally giving them the digital building blocks of 3D modeling. More specifically, users of TinkerCAD essentially build up their 3D printable objects using different 3D shapes, which can be freely adjusted. TinkerCAD 3D printing software also allows its users to save and share their 3D files online, as well as to export them to .STL when they are ready to be printed.

 

3D printing software #2: 3DSlash

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

System: Browser-based, or available for Windows, Mac, Linux, Raspberry Pi

Type: Geometric 3D modeling

Made by: 3DSlash

3DSlash is a great 3D modeling app for kids, or people of all ages who are getting into 3D design and printing. The software, which is notable for its awesome UX interface—it makes 3D modeling feel like you’re in a Minecraft game—offers a number of tools, such as chisels or hammers, which can be used to sculpt simple 3D object out of blocks, rather than build the shapes from scratch. This approach, perhaps more intuitive to beginners, is made all the more fun through the 3D printer software’s great look. In the end, 3D models can also be shared online or exported to .STL files for 3D printing. The 3DSlash platform also features a number of helpful 3D modeling tutorials.

 

3D printing software #3: 3DTin

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

System: Browser-based online app

Type: Geometric 3D modeling

Made by: Lagoa

3DTin’s simple interface and intuitive design tools make for a great 3D printing software option for beginners. Not only is the free browser-based online app a good entry-level 3D design option, but once makers have made an account with 3DTin, they will have access to a huge array of Creative Commons 3D models. In fact, with the 3D printing software, users can even add their own models to the large repository. 3DTin also allows its users to easily export their .STL models to 3D printing platforms such as i.Materialise, Thingiverse, and Sculpteo. To get the best results from the app, Lagoa does suggest running it with the JavaScript API WebGL.

 

3D printing software #4: 123D Design

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

System: PC, Mac and iPad

Type: Geometric 3D modeling

Made by: Autodesk

Autodesk’s 123D Design is a slightly more advanced 3D modeling program than the software developer’s TinkerCAD, though is still an excellent software for beginner level makers and 3D designers. The intuitive interface allows users to easily create objects from scratch as well as to edit pre-existing 3D models, which are available through the program’s extensive library of pre-made 3D objects. Finished 3D models can be easily exported to .STL or can even be directly uploaded to Shapeways’ 3D printing service for on-demand 3D printing.

 

3D printing software #5: Sculptris

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginner to Intermediate

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 3D Digital sculpting tool

Made by: Pixologic

Developed by Pixologic, the developer of ZBrush, Sculptris is a relatively easy to use digital sculpting software, which bases its method on the modeling of clay. So if beginner users are looking to explore beyond geometric 3D modeling, Sculptris might just be the best first step into the world of digital sculpting. In addition to modeling, the software lets users adjust the mesh geometry of their 3D object, as well as to add color and texture to the object through its “paint mode”.

 

3D printing software #6: Meshmixer

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginner to Intermediate

System: Windows, Mac or Linux

Type: 3D triangle mesh modeling

Made by: Autodesk

Most makers will be familiar with Meshmixer, as it is one of the most popular .STL file checking and repairing programs. The software, which can be used alongside the most rudimentary and entry-level modeling programs, as well as more advanced ones, lets users check and correct their 3D files before they are sent to the printer. That is, Meshmixer allows its users to preview, refine, and repair their 3D models to make sure they are 3D printable. Not only used for repairing, however, Meshmixer is also a powerful tool for designing and creating 3D models from scratch using triangle meshes.

In terms of exporting, Meshmixer supports a wide range of desktop 3D printer models so you can print right at home, or else it allows for easy exporting to Shapeways, Sculpteo, or i.materialise 3D printing services.

 

3D MODELING SOFTWARE - INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED

3D printing software #7: SketchUp

Cost: Free or $695 for SketchUp Pro

Geared to: Intermediate

System: Windows, Mac, or Linux

Type: Line and curve-based 3D modeling

Made by: Trimble

While boasting an easy-to-use interface, Trimble’s free SketchUp 3D modeling software features an impressive number of design tools and add-ons which can be used to create complex 3D objects. The 3D printing software, which operates using a line and curve-based modeling system, has been especially popular amongst architects and engineers, who can manipulate SketchUp’s lines and shapes to create any number of 3D forms.

If you’re not an architect or engineer, however, don’t let SketchUp be too daunting, as the 3D printing software offers a wide range of video tutorials to help get users started, as well as a free version of its program, SketchUp Make. The one downside of the free version, however, is that you can’t export .STL files directly from it, and will need to download and install an additional .STL export module.

 

3D printing software # 8: FreeCAD

Cost: Free

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows, Mac or Linux

Type: Parametric modeling

Made by: FreeCAD community (open source)

As the name suggests, FreeCAD is indeed a free (and open source!) 3D modeling software. Because the 3D printing software uses parametric modeling—a process based on algorithms and adjusted parameters rather than meshes—FreeCAD tends to be used by professionals, such as engineers, and advanced product designers. The open source software, which is compatible with Windows, Mac, or Linux, features a wide range of professional design tools, as well as a high learning curve. The software does also provide a number of comprehensive tutorials, as well as a large community to help get parametric design novices off the ground.

 

3D printing software #9: Blender

Cost: Free

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, or Linux

Type: 3D Digital sculpting tool

Made by: Blender Foundation (open source)

Blender, which was last year ranked by i.materialise as the most popular 3D modeling and design software (based on its extensive and enthusiastic 3D printing community), is a powerful open source 3D digital sculpting software geared primarily to advanced and even professional users. With extensive, and we mean extensive tools and design features, the 3D design software does not only support the modeling of complex 3D objects, but also includes rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing, motion tracking, and even video editing and game development. So, while it may take some time to learn the ins and outs of Blender, it is definitely one of the most in depth 3D printing software programs out there, and its free!

 

3D printing software #10: OpenSCAD

Cost: Free

Geared to: Advanced programmers

System: Windows, Mac or Linux

Type: Parametric modeling

Parametric modeling software OpenSCAD is slightly different from the other modeling programs we’ve listed so far, in that it is more geared towards programmers and coders rather than designers and artistic types. This means that while OpenSCAD might not be ideal for designing a piece of indoor decoration, it could be the ideal tool for generating 3D models of machine parts, for instance. The non-interactive modeller essentially works as a “3D-compiler” which generates 3D models from programming script files. This allows users to control the object’s parameters and properties extremely precisely, as well as to go back and edit steps simply and efficiently. OpenSCAD does allow its users to easily export .STL files once the 3D model is completed.

 

3D printing software #11: Onshape

Cost: Free or pro version for $100/month

Geared to: Beginner to Advanced

System: Browser-based online application; also available for iOS and Android

Type: Parametric modeling

Made by: Onshape

Onshape, a relatively new 3D printing software, boasts being the “first and only full-cloud 3D CAD system” which allows design teams to work collectively on a project using any web browser, phone, or tablet. That is, through the software’s fully cloud-based platform, design teams can work together in real-time to create team-based 3D models, an ideal feature for classrooms, design teams, and even professional engineering teams. In addition to Onshape’s standard parametric design tools and features, the 3D printing software also includes full CAD functionality, version control, and unlimited import and export for 3D printing.

The parametric based modeling software can either be accessed through a free version (which is relatively limited by 10 private documents and 5GB of storage) or through a professional version, which does away with these limitations for $100/month. Onshape users can also easily export their 3D models to Materialise and Pinshape, who are the software’s 3D printing partners.

 

3D printing software #12: Inventor

Cost: $235.00 to $1,890.00

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: Mechanical design and 3D CAD

Made by: Autodesk

Autodesk’s Inventor 3D modeling software is a comprehensive tool for mechanical design and simulations, and features an intuitive and straightforward interface. The 3D design program also offers users the option of either freeform, direct, and parametric modeling, and includes advanced design automation tools, as well as simulation and visualization tools. As a mechanical design software, Inventor might not be for your everyday 3D design needs, but is a powerful 3D printing software for designing parts and equipment which require certain mechanical properties.

 

3D printing software #13: Rhinoceros

Cost: $495-$1,695

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: NURBS-based 3D modeling

Made by: Robert McNeel & Associates

Rhinoceros, or Rhino3D, is a NURBS-based 3D modeling software that has become exceptionally popular for its diversity of features and uses, its low learning curve, and its compatibility with a wide number of file formats (essentially allowing users to use it as a converting tool between programs). The 3D modeling software has broad design potential, as it is often used by industrial designers and architects, as well as jewelry designers, artists, and for rapid prototyping. The latest version of the software is currently Rhino 5.

 

3D printing software #14: Grasshopper

Cost: Free

Geared to: Intermediate

System: Windows or Mac

Type: Algorithmic modeling

Made by: David Rutten

Grasshopper, actually a part of Rhinoceros, is worth mentioning for its singular algorithmic modeling purpose. The graphical algorithm editor works with Rhinoceros’ 3D modeling tools to generate complex structures, such a generative art. The best part about Grasshopper? You don’t have to be a programming or scripting expert to get some truly amazing generative design results, as the program allows users to design and build complex algorithm-based designs. To help navigate Grasshopper’s advanced interface, a number of tutorial videos are available to users.

 

3D printing software #15: SolidWorks

Cost: $3,995

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 3D mechanical CAD program

Made by:Dassault Systèmes Solidworks Corp.

3D mechanical CAD program SolidWorks has been around for two decades and is certainly recognized as a mainstay within the world of 3D design, especially amongst engineers and designers. In addition to 3D modeling, SolidWorks also includes extensive simulation, motion, and design validation tools, as well as reverse engineering capabilities, etc. The thorough and powerful software is thus well suited for designing industrial parts and components.

 

3D printing software #16: Cinema 4D

Cost: $3695

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 3D modeling, animation

Made by: Maxon Computer GmbH

Cinema 4D is a versatile 3D modeling software used for designing, animation, and rendering applications. The software is primarily geared towards creative uses, such as 3D graphics and 3D production. The Maxon Computer software features a number design options, including procedural or polygonal modeling, animating, lighting, texturing, and rendering. With all the extra features, the software provides not only a platform for designing 3D printable objects, but for exploring and creating virtual 3D worlds.

 

3D printing software #17: MAYA

Cost: $3,675

Geared to: Intermediate

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: 3D animation software

Made by: Autodesk

Autodesk’s 3D animation software MAYA has an intuitive design interface which has made it a popular tool amongst 3D modelers and designers. With its foremost applications being for 3D animation and visual effects, the software has also provided a useful platform for designing 3D printable models and its user friendly interface makes it accessible to less advanced designers. MAYA also comes equipped with sculpting tools as well as rigging and skinning tools, the latter of which allows users to change the proxy mesh according to the original mesh.

 

3D printing software #18: ZBrush

Cost: $795

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: Digital sculpting tool

Made by: Pixologic

ZBrush, is, in a way, the more advanced version of Pixologic’s Sculptris, in that it takes the digital sculpting platform to a whole new level. The 3D printing software essentially combines 3D and 2.5D modeling, along with texturing and painting to allow designers to create amazingly details 3D models. ZBrush uses Pixologic’s proprietary “pixol” technology, which makes tools such as lighting, color, material, and depth information easily accessible to makers. The current version of the software, ZBrush 4R7, includes such features as ArrayMesh, NanoMesh and ZModeler with QMesh. ZBrush can even export your 3D files to the 3D printer using a simple 3D Print Exporter.

 

3D printing software #19: 3ds Max

Cost: $3,675

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows

Type: 3D modeling and rendering

Made by: Autodesk

Autodesk’s extensive collection of 3D modeling and designing software includes 3ds Max, a modeling platform that also allows for animation, simulation, and rendering tools for video games, films, and motion graphics. Additionally, 3ds Max is what Autodesk call a collaborative software, meaning that the 3D modeling platform includes a number of user-requested features and upgrades that are built specifically for graphic and design professionals. In terms of 3D printable designs, 3ds Max is also equipped with mesh and surface modeling, as well as NURBS-based modeling, and a number of other useful features.

 

3D printing software #20: Fusion360

Cost: Free to $300/year

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Cloud-based platform for Windows and Mac

Type: 3D CAD/CAM design

Made by: Autodesk

Fusion 360 is Autodesk’s popular cloud-based 3D CAD/CAM design software that combines several elements, such as industrial and mechanical design, collaboration, and machining, into one platform. The 3D printing software, which is capable of importing both .OBJ and .STL files, also offers its users T-Spline, Solid, Parametric, and mesh modeling. Notably, Autodesk has made their 3D design suite available to students, hobbyists, and startups for no cost, and can be licensed for commercial purposes for $300 a year.

 

3D printing software #21: LightWave 3D

Cost: $695

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 3D animation software

Made by: NewTek

While NewTek’s LightWave 3D is a popular tool primarily used for visual effects, motion graphics, and video game development, it has also applications in 3D product design and is a capable software for designing 3D printable objects. And while LightWave 3D itself cannot export .STL files, it can export your design as an .OBJ or COLLADA file, which is recognized by such 3D printing services as Shapeways.

 

3D printing software #22: AutoCAD

Cost: $1,400 a year

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 2D and 3D CAD drafting

Made by: Autodesk

AutoCAD, for those unfamiliar, is Autodesk’s flagship CAD drafting software program, which is widely used by such professionals as engineers, architects, graphic designers, etc. With a wide number of applications, such as drafting architectural blueprints, designing computer chips, and more, AutoCAD has also become a popular tool for 3D designers and makers. For extra convenience, it is possible to send 3D models from AutoCAD directly to a number of 3D printing services using the software’s 3DPRINT command.

In 2010, Autodesk released a mobile app version of its AutoCAD 3D design software, called AutoCAD 360, although this platform only currently supports 2D CAD drawings.

 

3D printing software #23: MoI3D

Cost: $295

Geared to: Designers and artists

System: Windows or Mac

Type: 3D modeling

Made by: MoI3D

MoI3D is a 3D modeling software primarily geared towards creative designers and artists. The 3D printing software’s user-friendly interface is also compatible with pen-tablets and provides a simple and intuitive workflow for its users. At the relatively low cost of $295, MoI3D might not have all the tools and features of a more professional 3D modeling software, but it does provide a suitable platform for designing hard surface models and high quality polygon meshes.

 

3D printing software #24: MODO

Cost: $1,799

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: Polygon and subdivision surface modeling

Made by: The Foundry

Developed by Luxology, LLC (now known as The Foundry), MODO is a polygon and subdivision surface modeling, sculpting, 3D painting, animation, and rendering software, used for film and video content, product designing, and more. The 3D design software has been recognized for its MeshFusion Boolean tools, which allow for the flexible creation of freeform models, as well as its versatile sculpting tools. MODO also features such extensive creative tools as painting, rendering, baking, rigging, effects and animation. 3D models can be exported from MODO as .STL files.

 

3D printing software #25: Wings3D

Cost: Free

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: Subdivision modeler

Made by: Wings3D

Wings3D is a free and open-source subdivision modeler that was inspired by Izware’s Nendo and Mirai 3D modeling platforms. The 3D modeling software, written in Erlang programming language, boasts a customizable interface along with a wide range of 3D design tools. Notably, Wings3D features an AutoUV tool, which lets users digitally cut and unfold the 3D model’s surface to be exported for painting and surfacing texturing. The open source software is capable of exporting models to 3D printing formats such as .OBJ.

 

3D printing software #26: Creo

Cost: 2,200.00

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows

Type: Parametric modeling

Made by: PTC

PTC’s 3D modeling suite Creo consists of a number of applications, including Creo Parametric which allows for designers to create 3D models using parametric and direct modeling. Also included in the Creo suite are applications for simulating, sketching, illustrating, viewing, and more. In addition to designing 3D printable models, Creo can be used for assembly modeling for industrial parts, weld modeling, and structural framework design. The extensive 3D printing software is used in a number of industries, including automotive, medical, and even entertainment.

 

3D printing software #27: BRL-CAD

Cost: Free

Geared to: Intermediate to Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux, BSD, Solaris

Type: CSG solid modeling

Made by: BRL-CAD

BRL-CAD is a cross-platform open source constructive solid geometry (CSG) solid modeling software which is also capable of interactive 3D solid geometry editing, rendering and geometric analysis. The software, which for the past two decades has been the U.S. military’s primary tri-service CAD modeling program, has been used within many sectors, and has applications in the design and analysis of such things as vehicles, mechanical parts, and architecture. The powerful software is perhaps not best suited to beginners, as it includes over 400 tools, utilities, and applications. BRL-CAD has been open source and free since 2004.

SLICERS & 3D Printer Hosts

 

3D printing software # 28: Cura

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

Geared to: Beginner to Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, or Linux

Type: Slicer software

Made by: Ultimaker

3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker developed Cura as an open-source slicing and 3D printer host software. Easily one of the most popular 3D slicing programs amongst makers, Cura is not only limited to use with Ultimaker 3D printers (it is compatible with RepRap, Makerbot, Printrbot, Lulzbot, and more), and offers even entry-level makers an easy-to-use and intuitive interface. For more advanced makers, Cura also has an “Expert” mode, which allows for more precise control over print settings.

 

3D printing software #29: CraftWare

Cost: Free

Geared to: Beginners

System: Windows and Mac

Type: Slicer software

Made by: CraftUnique

CraftWare is another downloadable free slicing program, which similar to Cura functions on both an “Easy” and “Expert” mode, making it suitable for beginners and more advanced users alike. The slicer is perhaps most recognized for its impressive G-code visualizer, which identifies features using different colors, as well as its support setting mode, which is comparable to that of Simplify3D.

Currently, CraftWare is still in its Beta stage, so its developers are still tweaking some things and are asking for feedback from users.

 

3D printing software #30: Netfabb Basic

Cost: Free

Geared to: Intermediate

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: 3D repair and slicer

Made by: Netfabb

Netfabb Basic is a free but powerful slicing software that also incorporates repairing and editing tools into its features. Having these extra features allows makers to make last minute adjustments to their prints without having to bring in additional repairing software or tools. Netfabb also offers a Professional edition of its software, which comes with a €1,500 price tag.

 

3D printing software #31: Repetier

Cost: Free

Geared to: Intermediate

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: 3D slicer and 3D printer host

Made by: Hot-World GmbH & Co. KG

Repetier is an open-source slicing and 3D printer host which is predominantly popular within the RepRap 3D printer community (but is compatible with most commercial FDM 3D printers). The platform includes useful tools such as multi extruder support (for up to 16 extruders!), multi slicer support (meaning that it is integrated with Slic3r, CuraEngine and Skeinforge slicers and can accommodate more), multi part printing, and more. Repetier also allows its users to access and control 3D prints from its browser-based server through desktop, tablets, or even smartphones.

 

3D printing software #32: Simplify3D

Cost: $149

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linus

Type: 3D repair and slicer

Made by: Simplify3D

For more advanced makers and 3D designers, Simplify3D offers a professional interface and a number of versatile tools to help check, repair, and prepare your 3D model with optimal print settings. Simplify3D is notable for a number of things, including its fabrication process visualizer, which lets makers see a virtual version of the print to see where mistakes could potentially occur in the actual print. The 3D repair and slicer software also offers a wide number of infill patterns, can automatically create supports, and can accommodate dual extrusion 3D printers with its Dual Extrusion Wizard tool. The latter could allow for makers to print their supports in a different, more easily removable material than the main print.

Compatible with almost all 3D printer models, Simplify3D can also be used as a 3D printer host, though does not offer a wireless option for this.

 

3D printing software #33: Slic3r

Cost: Free

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: Open source slicer software

Made by: Slic3r

Open source G-code generator Slic3r is a popular tool amongst makers, as the cross-platform program generally produces good results and quickly. The slicing program, which effectively prepares your 3D file for printing by turning it into instructions for the 3D printer, also boasts having multiple views, so users can visualize their model better, as well as a 3D honeycomb infill setting, which allows users to vary their object’s infill pattern. In fact, because of the software’s open source nature, a number of innovative features have been integrated into it, such as multiple extruders, brim, micro-layering, bridge detection, command line slicing, variable layer heights, sequential printing, mesh cutting, object splitting into parts, AMF support, and more.

 

3D printing software #34: OctoPrint

Cost: Free

Geared to: Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: 3D printer host

Made by: OctoPrint

As a 3D printer host, OctoPrint allows makers to wirelessly control their 3D printers through virtually any browser. The 3D printer host software can also read G-code from 3D printer slicer programs, which, in combination with its gCodeVisualizer, allows makers to see their G-code files before and throughout the print.

OctoPrint is an immensely popular open-source tool that might be the best option for remotely monitoring and controlling your 3D print.

 

3D printing software #35: 3DPrinterOS

Cost: Free to $200/year

Geared to: Beginner to Advanced

System: Windows, Mac, Linux

Type: 3D printer operating system

Made by: 3D Control Systems Ltd.

3DPrinterOS is marketed as being the world’s first operating system for 3D printers. The cloud-based system allows users to do a wide range of things in preparing their 3D models for printing including repairing designs, customizing settings, slicing the models and sending them to be printed virtually anywhere in the world. This last feature allows makers to share CAD files through an extensive network of 3D printers through a single cloud-based interface.

Using 3DPrinter OS, your 3D printer can be connected to the cloud in three ways: through a software client, through hardware (i.e. Intel, Raspberry Pi, Arduino), or by being embedded into your 3D printer.

One final note about the paid 3D printing and 3D printer software: almost all of them offer 30-day free trials so you can see whether or not one of them is the right 3D modeling software for you.

 

 

Posted in 3D Software

 

 

Maybe you also like:


   


Jan Børge Vik wrote at 10/27/2016 2:29:29 PM:

Inventor, SolidWorks,AutoCAD and Creo are on your list of advanced software. All of them strictly parametric and single core, acis or parasolid. For 12 years 3D printing for me have ment creating, convert or prototype solids, and I would never have been able to do that effective enough on a parametric or non hybrid kernal CAD software. So much easier and faster ! I have used IronCAD for all this, and I think 250.000 pro users do. For use for only 3D modelling theyr product Inovate is the same, without the 2D engineering tools and a lot cheaper. Double the export/import power and no parasolid/acis isuess when collaborating or shareing models due to the hybrid kernal. Import from scan without spendy add on modules, and an absolute "killer" in combination with Blender,Meshlab or Rhino.

krosstoph wrote at 10/26/2016 1:37:14 PM:

Autodesk did not eliminate the free version. You can use the trial for 30 days and after that you will be left with what up until now was Netfabb Basic,

krozn wrote at 10/24/2016 9:17:19 AM:

Miss Mattercontrol in "Slicers & 3D Printer Hosts"

Patrick Moore wrote at 10/22/2016 8:58:59 PM:

Autodesk bought Netfab, eliminated the free version, then changed the cloud application to only output .3mf files. A fie on thee, Autodesk!

DWK wrote at 10/21/2016 4:51:21 AM:

Out of all those you leave out SpaceClaim? Really?

phil wrote at 10/20/2016 6:19:17 PM:

Correcticion Kisslicer converts from inches to metric with push of 1 button also Kisslicer has a nice layer viewer Cubify Design, Cubify Sculpt, Cubify Invent

phil wrote at 10/20/2016 6:12:03 PM:

Kisslicer free and pro versions produces very clean g-code with excellent documentation Slice .stl and coverts from metric to inches with a push of 1 button



Leave a comment:

Your Name:

 


Subscribe us to

3ders.org Feeds 3ders.org twitter 3ders.org facebook   

About 3Ders.org

3Ders.org provides the latest news about 3D printing technology and 3D printers. We are now five years old and have around 1.5 million unique visitors per month.

News Archive